Madeline

Category Archives: Madeline

Hi there, it’s Madeline, 21 Acres intern!

Thanks to Robert Inn Photography for this gorgeous photo of the produce in our Farm Market, including some lovely green cabbages.
Thanks to Robert Inn Photography for this gorgeous photo of the produce in our Farm Market, including some lovely green cabbages.

I’m a huge fan of a classic meatball dinner. But as a busy college student, I can’t usually spare the time to form them one by one and cook them in a pot of sauce. A couple of years ago, I experimented by cooking them in a muffin tin, and haven’t made regular meatballs since! I love using cabbage instead of pasta to use up a huge head of cabbage and get some more veggies, too.

A veggie-packed and allergy-friendly version of spaghetti and meatballs, this recipe is a delicious, easy twist on a classic weeknight dinner.

Turkey Mini Meatloaves with Green Cabbage and Marinara

Serves 4

Ingredients

Marinara:

  • 2 tablespoons oil, such as grapeseed (olive works too)
  • 1/2 onion, finely chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 (28-oz) can crushed tomatoes (maybe some you canned yourself!)
  • 1 small bunch fresh basil, chopped
  • 2 sprigs fresh thyme
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 head green cabbage, finely shredded

Turkey:

  • 1lb ground turkey breast
  • 1 egg, whisked
  • 1 tablespoon oil, such as grapeseed (olive works too)
  • 1/2 onion, finely chopped
  • 4 large carrots, finely chopped
  • 1 small bunch fresh basil, chopped
  • 2 sprigs fresh thyme
  • Hefty pinch salt

Directions

Heat the oil in a saucepan and sauté the onion until translucent, then add the garlic and sauté until fragrant. Add the tomatoes, herbs, and salt, and simmer uncovered for about 10 minutes. Then add the shredded cabbage and simmer for another 20-30 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. If you have a food processor, use it to chop the onions, garlic, carrots, and herbs; it’ll save a lot of time! Mix all of the ingredients in a large bowl with your hands. Then scoop the meat mixture into a 12-cup muffin tin that’s either lined with muffin liners (easiest cleanup) or lightly greased with oil. Bake for about 25 minutes, or until the internal temperature of the turkey muffins reaches at least 165 degrees F. Let rest for 10 minutes before removing from the tin, taking off the muffin liners if you used them, and adding to the pot of marinara and cabbage. These make great leftovers, too.

 
Thanks for reading!
-Madeline

Did you try this recipe? Let us know in the comments below!

 

Hello! It’s Madeline here, 21 Acres intern.

Every fall, I get so excited for butternut squash season. Roasted alone or with pasta, its slightly sweet flavor and tender, creamy texture is so delicious. I also love it in this simple soup that comes together with almost no effort!

This recipe and photo are from my cookbook I wrote in high school. It’s awesome to be able to put them to use here on our blog, too!
This recipe and photo are from my cookbook I wrote in high school. It’s awesome to be able to put them to use here on our blog, too!

Butternut Squash Soup

Serves 6

Ingredients

  • 1 medium butternut squash, peeled and cut into ½-1 inch cubes (6 cups)
  • 1 medium onion, roughly diced (2 cups)
  • 2 tablespoons grapeseed oil (olive oil is okay too)
  • 1 cup low-sodium vegetable broth (preferably homemade)
  • 3 cups water
  • Salt, to taste (I use 1 teaspoon)
  • Black pepper, to taste
  • Organic sour cream, if desired

Directions

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. On a baking sheet, place the squash, onion, oil, salt and pepper. Toss to coat. Bake for about 45 minutes, or until the squash is easily pierced with a fork and is tender throughout.

Place the squash mixture, vegetable broth, and water into a regular blender and blend until smooth. You may need to do this in several batches, depending on the size of your blender, or you could use an immersion blender. Top with sour cream, if desired, and serve hot or cold.

 

Thanks for reading!
-Madeline


Did you try this recipe? Let us know in the comments below!

Hello! It’s Madeline, here.

While perusing recipe blogs recently, I came across this awesome idea for thumbprint jam cookies with goat cheese! As a self-proclaimed goat cheese aficionado, I was so excited to try my hand at making a recipe using the fresh Gothberg Farms goat cheese sold in our Farm Market. I wrote and photographed a cookbook in high school, but it’s been awhile since I’ve developed and photographed recipes. It’s great to be back at it again.

thumbprintcookies

The basil made its way into these cookies after I sampled the kitchen’s fruit salad with balsamic vinegar and fresh basil recently. A week later and it was still on my mind… I’m definitely a sweet and savory kind of girl! My family was mixed on the addition of basil in these – some loved it and some didn’t. If you’re not a fan of basil, feel free to leave it out!

These cookies are a soft, slightly sweet, and unique twist on a classic jam thumbprint cookie. They’re a great way to use up an abundance of ripe berries if you make fresh jam, and are delicious with tea or coffee. I hope you try them!

(Side note & shameless plug: I tried Gothberg Farms’ chevre for the first time recently and it is amazing! Not as tangy as other chevres, it is sweet and sooo creamy. Matt, our new Nutritionist and Local Foods Coordinator, doesn’t like goat cheese but even he enjoyed this one in a smashed cherry panzanella salad from one of Liesl’s market demos. Recipe for the salad will come soon…)

Sweet & Savory Goat Cheese Thumbprint Cookies with Basil and Strawberry Jam

Yield: 30 cookies

Ingredients

  • 1 ¾ cups unbleached flour
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ cup softened butter
  • 3 oz goat cheese, softened
  • ½ cup cane sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil
  • About ¼ cup low-sugar strawberry jam

Directions

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

In a medium bowl, beat together the butter and sugar until fluffy. Add the egg and beat until mixed. Stir in the flour, salt, and basil until just incorporated. Chill the dough in the fridge for at least 30 minutes.

Scoop the dough into 1-inch balls, and place on an ungreased baking sheet (these won’t spread much).  Use your thumb to form an indent about ½ inch deep into each cookie. Add a small scoop of jam into each indent – no need to be precise with measurements!

Bake the cookies for 15-17 minutes, or until the bottoms are golden. Enjoy!

Notes: You can use any type of jam in place of strawberry. Fig, blackberry, raspberry, apricot, or blueberry would be great, too.

 

Thanks for reading!
-Madeline

 Did you try this recipe? Let us know in the comments below!

Hello! Madeline here, 21 Acres intern.

Pesto, sauteed mushrooms, and caramelized onions: I think it’s hard to go wrong with this combination.

polenta pies
Another recipe from my cookbook I wrote and photographed in high school.

These flavorful little bundles are a great appetizer or snack. Polenta is the perfect backdrop to caramelized onions, crimini mushrooms, and pesto. I love using precooked polenta to save time, but you can easily make your own, too.  The spinach adds a pop of color and nutrition, and the breadcrumb topping is simply awesome! I hope you try them.

Mini Polenta Pesto Pies

Serves 6

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon grapeseed oil (olive works too)
  • 1 medium onion, sliced
  • 10 oz crimini mushrooms, thinly sliced
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
  • 1 tube (18-oz) precooked polenta (or homemade)
  • 2 tablespoons pesto (homemade if possible!)
  • ½ cup fresh chopped spinach
  • 1-2 pieces bread of choice
  • 1 tablespoon melted butter

Directions

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. In a large sauté pan, heat the olive oil on medium-high heat. Add the onion and cook until translucent and starting to brown. Add in the mushrooms and cook until they have released most of their water. Add the salt, pepper, and balsamic vinegar and continue cooking until the onions are caramelized and the mushrooms are nicely browned. Meanwhile, pulse the bread in a food processor until it is crumbs. Add the melted butter. Then, slice the curved ends off the polenta, and then slice the remaining log into 8 even slices. Place each slice into a half-cup ramekin, and top each slice with one teaspoon of pesto. Top with a few leaves of spinach, and then evenly distribute the mushroom and onion mixture into the ramekins. Sprinkle the breadcrumbs over the top of the ramekins, and  bake for 20-25 minutes, until golden brown.

 

Thanks for reading! 
-Madeline

Did you make this recipe? Let us know in the comments below!

Here’s another “Links We’re Loving” post from 21 Acres.

The links shared here will be thought-provoking, useful, or otherwise interesting to those like us that are passionate about sustainable agriculture. We all may have different opinions about these issues, but here at 21 Acres we love to talk about them.

We hope you take a look at them!

This weed is taking over the planet. On the upside, it’s delicious

  • This Grist article discusses the growth of wild amaranth as a weed and ways to use it. We have amaranth “weeds” growing abundantly on the 21 Acres farm!

FDA’s Six Month Update Shows There’s Still More to Do

  • This article from Food & Water Watch discusses the FDA’s recent six-month update regarding progress after the announcement of its voluntary efforts to change how antibiotics are used in factory farming.

Homemade Wheat Thins

  • Here’s a great way to make these famous crackers at home, using ingredients you trust. Thanks to Oh She Glows, one of the top vegan recipe blogs.

The Best Whole Chicken in a Crock Pot

  • Many local farmers sell chickens whole, which is the best value for the consumer. If you’d like to try using the whole animal but aren’t quite sure how to prepare it, here’s a foolproof and delicious way to cook a chicken from the blog 100 Days of Real Food.

The secret to richer, carbon-capturing soil? Treat your microbes well

  • Another piece from food writer Nathaniel Johnson at Grist (check last week’s Links We’re Loving to see another piece by him!), this time it’s all about soil health! Another reminder about the myriad ways that agriculture affects our climate and environment.

 

Thanks for reading our current collection of articles! Please share your thoughts in the comments below. 

 -Madeline

Hello! This is Madeline, 21 Acres intern.

If your garden is anything like the 21 Acres farm, it is exploding with zucchini right now. Here’s the perfect way to use some of it up!

This week’s recipe comes from Asako, our head chef and master baker here at 21 Acres. I had the pleasure of tasting some fresh from the kitchen and knew that I had to recreate it at home! I made a loaf into muffins and used zucchini from our farm here. Topped with a little local butter and WOW it is good! Tender, moist, and slightly sweet, this is some awesome bread.

Asako uses farro flour in this recipe, which is a variety of wheat. It’s got a great nutty flavor that is delicious in this bread – we sell it in our Market from a local producer if you’d like to try it out. You could substitute whole wheat pastry flour if you prefer.

Zucchini Bread

Makes 1 loaf or 12 muffins

Ingredients

  • 2 cups farro flour
  • 1.5 lb zucchini (washed, dried, ends removed; if using large zucchini, cut in half lengthwise and seed it)
  • ½ cup + 2 tablespoons sugar, divided
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ cup plain yogurt
  • 2 large eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 6 tablespoons butter, melted

Directions

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Grease the bottom and sides of a 9x5in loaf pan; dust with flour, tapping out the excess. (Or, prepare a 12-cup muffin tin.)

Shred the zucchini on the large holes of a box grater. Toss with 2 tablespoons sugar and drain, wrapping it in paper towels, cheesecloth, or a clean kitchen towel to squeeze out excess liquid. The sugar makes a big difference – you can get a lot more liquid out!

Whisk together the rest (½ cup) of the sugar, yogurt, eggs, lemon juice, and melted butter. In another bowl, mix the farro flour, baking soda, baking powder, and salt.

Stir the wet mix and well-drained zucchini into the dry mixture until just moistened. Scrape the batter into the prepared pan and smooth the surface.

Bake until the loaf or muffins are golden brown and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. I baked mine in a muffin tin for about 25 minutes.


Thanks for reading, and thank you to Asako for this awesome recipe!
-Madeline

Did you try this recipe? Let us know in the comments below!

Welcome to the first “Links We’re Loving” post here on the 21 Acres blog! We’ll be creating these posts regularly to share articles, recipes, and other pages from around the web that we’ve enjoyed recently.

The links shared here will be thought-provoking, useful, or otherwise interesting to those like us that are passionate about sustainable agriculture. We all may have different opinions about these issues, but here at 21 Acres we love to talk about them.

We hope you take a look at these links!

 

The 10 Most Inspirational Sustainability Initiatives in the U.S.

  • An interesting look at some of the leaders in various areas of sustainable innovation around the country

 Caramelized Peach Caprese with Smoked Sea Salt

  • This recipe would be great with local peaches that are in-season right now, and some smoked salt from the local producer SaltWorks, Inc. that we sell in our Farm Market!

 What I learned from six months of GMO research: None of it matters

  • A surprisingly moderate take on the issue of genetically modified foods, this article from Grist brings up some intriguing points that I hadn’t thought about before. Whatever your thoughts on GMOs, this is definitely worth the read!

**By the way – here at 21 Acres we don’t use or sell GMO-containing products. However, we recognize the importance of learning about and discussing the benefits and consequences of using GMOs. 

 How to Afford Real Food on a Budget

  • This post from the popular blog, 100 Days of Real Food, has some great tips on eating sustainably and healthily while on a budget.

 What Does “Natural” Mean?

  • This Mother Jones article gives a smart reminder about greenwashing and the lack of meaningful regulation of the “natural” label.

 

Thanks for reading our current collection of articles! Please share your thoughts in the comments below. 
 
-Madeline

 

Hello! It’s Madeline today, 21 Acres summer intern.

If you’re someone who loves to experiment with and tweak recipes, then this post is for you. While traditional Italian pesto uses fresh basil, garlic, pine nuts, olive oil, and parmesan, there are many ways to experiment, especially if you’re using in-season and local ingredients.

Thanks to Robert Inn Photography for this beautiful photo of the greens from our farm in the 21 Acres Market.
Thanks to Robert Inn Photography for this beautiful photo of the greens from our farm in the 21 Acres Market.

Pesto: it’s one of those wonderfully forgiving recipes that’s fairly hard to mess up:

  • It comes out too thick? Add more oil.
  • Too thin? Add more greens or nuts.
  • Love garlic? Go crazy with it, or try roasting it.
  • All out of basil, but your garden is exploding with carrots? Use the carrot tops instead!

If you’ve never made your own pesto at home, now’s the time to try! I thought it would be fun to create a basic template for making pesto to give you more ideas on this nearly-foolproof spread. Here in the 21 Acres kitchen, our chefs are constantly experimenting with new variations on pesto.Get creative!

We even had a 21 Acres member event in August: Pesto Through the Seasons – click here to read the recap.

Mix ‘n’ Match Pesto

  • Herbs or greens  (~2 cups) – such as basil, cilantro, parsley, mint, carrot tops, spinach, arugula, kale, mustard greens, sorrel, or any other herb or leafy green
  • Oil (~1/2 cup) – such as olive, grapeseed, safflower, etc.
  • Garlic (as many cloves as you like – usually 2-4) – try using garlic scapes, or try roasting the garlic beforehand!
  • Nuts or seeds (~1/2 cup) – walnuts, pine nuts, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, pecans, almonds, cashews, etc.
  • Salt (to taste) – don’t be timid with it!
  • (Optional) Cheese (~1/4 cup) – parmesan, asiago, pecorino, etc. (I’ve even seen avocado!)

Blend everything except the oil in a blender or food processor, then slowly stream in the oil until it’s the consistency you’re looking for.

Other Tips:

  • For bitter or hardier greens (like mustard greens or kale), try blanching or sautéing them
  • Younger carrot tops sometimes taste better
  • Try roasting the garlic or sautéing it with the greens
  • You can always use multiple types of greens, herbs or nuts in pesto, too, if you want just a hint of the more flavorful greens like arugula and mint
  • Try toasting the nuts or seeds
  • STORAGE: It’s best to use homemade pesto right away, but you can store it in an airtight container (such as a jar) in the fridge for a few weeks or in the freezer (jarred or in an ice cube tray) for a couple months. To keep it from browning, you can pour a bit of oil over the top in the jar each time after you use it.
  • Vary the degree to which you process the pesto for chunkier or smoother sauce

Creative Ways to Use Pesto

  • Toss with steamed or roasted vegetables
  • Sauce for pasta (mix into marinara, cream sauce, or by itself)
  • Stir into waffle or pancake batter for a savory twist on breakfast (top with an egg instead of syrup!)
  • Stir into grain salad (rice, quinoa, farro, polenta, oats, etc.)
  • Stir into hummus
  • Bake into breads
  • Stir into plain yogurt as a dip
  • Spread on bruschetta
  • Spread on sandwiches or wraps
  • Use as pizza sauce (or in addition to)
  • Use as a salad dressing
  • Stir into softened butter to use on bread
  • Use as a marinade for meats
  • Spread on grilled corn
  • Dollop on cooked meats
  • Use to garnish soups
  • Stir into scrambled eggs
 
Thanks for reading!
-Madeline

 

Did you try this recipe? Let us know in the comments below!

 

Hi there!

I’m Madeline, one of 21 Acres’ summer interns. I’m a student at Grinnell College in Iowa, but am originally from Kirkland, WA and am home for the summer. I’m extremely passionate about sustainability, food, and health, and I’m so excited to be working at the sustainable food and farm oasis that is 21 Acres! I’ll be writing blog posts for the next couple of months here, among other projects, so you’ll be seeing much more of me soon.

Madeline2Madeline1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Beets: It seems to me that you either love them or you hate them. If you’re part of the latter group, I’d highly encourage you to try this recipe below just to make sure. I’ve made this recipe for lifelong beet-haters in the past and they’ve been pleasantly surprised. The caramelized, roasted garlic definitely helps!

Plus, now’s the perfect time to be adventurous – beets have been gracing farmers’ markets for awhile, but soon farms (including ours!) will be swimming in these versatile red and golden root veggies.

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