Farm Features

Discover what makes our farm unique

Come explore and see firsthand all of the features of our working farm.  From the garden shed that was the first building constructed on the 21 Acres site, to the apiary where our bees return from their work pollinating the Valley, to the children’s and veterans’ garden areas to our row crops growing in our Certified Organic acreage. No matter the season, there is always something interesting to see. Visitors who walk to the furthest point of the farm are treated to a vista of Mt. Rainier to the south, the exuberance of the two community gardens and a glimpse of the weather station to the north.

Take a self-guided tour the farm during our farm hours or join us for a scheduled farm walk with an expert guide.

    • Explore the Farm
    • Feel free to walk the farm paths when the gate is open
January - DecemberTues - Sat

dawn - dusk
Garden Shed

The Garden Shed served as an early demonstration of many sustainable construction principles later incorporated in today’s larger Center. 21 Acres staff and volunteers built the shed with recycled materials, including salvaged concrete. It is naturally lit through the south-facing windows, which also provide passive solar heating. A vine trellis creates shade keeping the structure cool. The walls are constructed with cellulose insulation made from recycled denim. The shed has its own living roof, which filters rainwater and serves as wildlife habitat.

Apiary

Our small apiary is home to our honeybees and beehives and a constant reminder of the critically important role that pollination plays in the growing of food. The apiary is a valued stop during farm tours and youth summer farm camps. During a good season, the honeybees also provide over 200 pounds of honey that sells quickly in the 21 Acres Farm Market. Whether you are 2 years old or 92, everyone who visits has an opportunity to learn more about how honeybees make the food we love.

Plant Nursery

We propagate plants in our nascent plant nursery as the first phase of providing education related to natural area restoration work. We propagate a variety of native, perennial, edible, and medicinal plant stock to use on the farm and in the kitchen. We choose plants that provide a variety of ecosystem services including erosion control and conservation buffers, possess characteristics like low maintenance, disease resistance, drought tolerance, and are beautiful!

Community Gardens

A pleasurable walk on the farm might include a visit to one or both community gardens.  This partnership in soil, water and food has existed since 2005. Garden plots are leased and represent an investment of time and hard work to grow food for the owner’s family. Gardeners are happy to share knowledge, but please know that unlike some public gardens where harvest is open to all, here, if you did not plant it, please do not pick it. For more info please contact these groups directly: Good Earth Community Garden,gecgarden@gmail.com; P-Patch 2.1 Garden, Karin Cathey, 425-823-4583

Veteran Contributions

21 Acres is honored to have a history of support from veterans on the farm and across campus. For example, Veterans Conservation Corps helped establish special areas that provide opportunities for reflection, community connections, and continued learning. The youth garden area is home to a beautiful pergola that veterans built. You may find remembrance flags flying here. Please enjoy this space to foster a deep appreciation for agriculture, habitat restoration, horticulture, or nature-based connections. If you’re interested in getting involved learn about volunteering.

Weather Station

On the farm, we host one of the 178 automated AgWeatherNet weather stations that help feed information into systems that farmers rely on to make decisions about day-to-day operations. These stations, monitored by Washington State University, collect local data, including air temperature, relative humidity, dew point temperature, rainfall, wind speed, solar radiation, and more. Our station (#60), installed in 2008, has collected a lot of information over the years. You can see the current weather at 21 Acres right now, or explore the data collected by our station and other stations around the state on the AgWeatherNet site.